What Is SSL & Why It Makes Your Website More Secure

Imagine if your premises weren’t up to building code.

One day, the building authority comes past and posts a large sign outside your shop: ‘Warning – Do Not Enter’. And for good measure, they string up some black and yellow caution tape around the front.

What happens next?
Of course, your customer numbers plummet. Casual browsers and walk-ins start avoiding your shop at all costs. They even start walking on the other side of the street.

‘Is that building about to collapse?’ they ask themselves. ‘Or is there a toxic waste dump hidden inside?’ And sales begin to dry up.

This would be a nightmare scenario for many businesses. Most owners wouldn’t hesitate to fork out the cost to get the building code back up to standard.

In fact, there is a digital equivalent of this kind of event. And it might be happening to your business.

Have you ever noticed that some URLs start with “http://” while others start with “https://”? Perhaps you noticed that extra “s” when you were browsing websites that require giving over sensitive information, like when you were paying bills online.

But where’d that extra “s” come from, and what does it mean?
To put it simply, the extra “s” means your connection to that website is secure and encrypted any data you enter is safely shared with that website. The technology that powers that little “s” is called SSL, which stands for Secure Sockets Layer.

Are security warnings scaring away potential customers?

Have you ever noticed that some URLs start with “http://” while others start with “https://”? Perhaps you noticed that extra “s” when you were browsing websites that require giving over sensitive information, like when you were paying bills online. But where’d that extra “s” come from, and what does it mean?

To put it simply, the extra “s” means your connection to that website is secure and encrypted any data you enter is safely shared with that website. The technology that powers that little “s” is called SSL, which stands for Secure Sockets Layer.

Google recently updated the very popular Chrome browser to display a ‘Not Secure’ warning for websites with unsecured webpages. That means if you don’t have a valid security certificate – called an ‘SSL certificate’ – your website appears toxic to online passersby.

While the average internet user might not fully understand what the warning means, they trust their browser to highlight these kinds of security risks. As soon as they see a message that says ‘warning, enter at your own risk,’ they stop browsing. And then off they go to a competitor’s website.

As ransomware, phishing, service hacks and new vulnerabilities emerge every few months, internet users are more conscious about online security. So, it’s time to make sure your business is up to scratch....

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